Alexander Turnbull Library

Community Organisation

Alexander Turnbull Library
National Library of New Zealand
cnr Molesworth & Aitken Streets
Thorndon
Wellington 6144
12 days ago

Carmen doco followed by paewhiri kōrero on gender identity

The Team from Alexander Turnbull Library

A Festival inspired by Wellington’s rich history of queer fairs and festivals. 2020 will mark the 34th Out in the Park, Wellington’s queer fair since 1986.

Date: Monday, 2 March, 2020
Time: 6:15pm to 8:15pm
Cost: Free
Location: Taiwhanga Kahau — Auditorium (lower ground floor), Corner … View more
A Festival inspired by Wellington’s rich history of queer fairs and festivals. 2020 will mark the 34th Out in the Park, Wellington’s queer fair since 1986.

Date: Monday, 2 March, 2020
Time: 6:15pm to 8:15pm
Cost: Free
Location: Taiwhanga Kahau — Auditorium (lower ground floor), Corner Molesworth and Aitken Streets, Wellington. Entrance on Aitken Street.

Celebrate cultural icon Carmen Rupe
Celebrate cultural icon Carmen Rupe in 1989 documentary ‘Carmen’. Learn the story of a vivacious performer, businesswoman, brothel keeper, LGBT rights and HIV/AIDS activist.

‘Carmen: the documentary’ profiles one of New Zealand’s most flamboyant and well know trans identities and advocates. In a candid open discussion with Carmen she walks and talks us through her early days living in Taumarunui through to her heydays in the entertainment industry.

‘Carmen: the documentary’ was produced and directed by Geoff Steven. Screening by kind permission of Geoff Steven.

Dynamic discussion

Following the film, there will be a dynamic discussion from a panel featuring Taupuruariki Brightwell, Peri and Karen Te Wao Richard Tankersley, and Tuiloma Lina Samu on gender diversity, sexuality and identity.

This event is hosted in partnership with Te Puna Mātauranga The National Library as part of Wellington’s Pride Week events.

About the panel
Panel Facilitator: Gareth Seymore grew up in Tokoroa. After school he studied in Tāmaki Makaurau and Kirikiriroa and now lives in Te Whanganui-a-Tara. In four years at Ngā Taonga he has worked in a variety of roles supporting the contract with Te Māngai Pāho, and now holds the role of Pouwhakahaere, Kaupapa Māori.

Karen & Peri Te Wao say you know you’re getting old when you appear in an iconic photo collage owned by Chrissy Witoko, displayed in her Evergreen Coffee Lounge in Vivian Street, Wellington. Like Carmen, Chrissy supported many people from all walks. She also enjoyed capturing history of the rainbow community in her way and displayed them proudly to anyone who entered her business premises. In a way, that is also what we are about. We are kind people who celebrate our communities (Tapatoru and Tātou), in our way.

Taupuruariki (Ariki) Brightwell (Rongowhakaata, Ngati Maru, Te Whanau a Ruataupare, Te Arawa, Tuwharetoa, Ngati Toa, Ngati Raukawa. Nga motu o Tahiti) is an Takatapui Indigenous artist of Maori, Rarotonga and Tahitian descent. She devotes herself to art and storytelling, revolving around her history and tipuna. She is the 27th generation of an unbroken line of artists.

Tuiloma Lina-Jodi Vaine Samu (she/ her) is a Samoan woman born in Aotearoa New Zealand. She was born, raised, educated and lived in Ōtahūhū and Mangere, South Auckland. She is the fifth child of 6 children of the late Tuiloma Molipopo Samu nee Iusitini of Sapunaoa, Falealili & Pu’apu’a Savai’I, Samoa and Leatufale Lila Samu of Salelesi and Faleula, Upolu Samoa. Formerly employed at Te Kāhui Tika Tangata, the NZ Human Rights Commission based in Auckland, she has now moved to Whanganui-ā-Tara to work at the Ministry for Pacific Peoples as Principal Advisor for its newly established Pacific Languages Revitalisation Unit (putting to use her doctoral research).

Richard Tankersleyis currently Principal Maori Advisor at the Royal NZ College of General Practitioners. From 2008 to 2017 he held the position of Human Rights Commissioner where his areas of experience were sexual orientation, gender identify and sex characteristics. For over 20 years Richard was the Diversity and Inclusion Consultant Facilitator at Matariki Services Ltd.

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14 days ago

PRIDE2020 – IN THE VAULT with Pere Wihongi

The Team from Alexander Turnbull Library

In The Vault is excited to be supporting PRIDE2020! A chill vibe to close the week with some of Aotearoa’s finest Rainbow community talent. Pere Wihongi, Valkyrie and Callan James share their music and their journeys
Date: Thursday 5th March 2020
Time: 6.15 – 8.30 (Doors open at 6pm)
Cost: … View more
In The Vault is excited to be supporting PRIDE2020! A chill vibe to close the week with some of Aotearoa’s finest Rainbow community talent. Pere Wihongi, Valkyrie and Callan James share their music and their journeys
Date: Thursday 5th March 2020
Time: 6.15 – 8.30 (Doors open at 6pm)
Cost: Free
Venue: Te Ahumairangi National Library of New Zealand Thorndon

Join us to celebrate PRIDE2020 and our Pūkana: Moments in Māori Performance exhibition.
The In the Vault series born in 2019 presents new and classic music from Aotearoa, supporting young and upcoming and reliving some of the old school sounds.

Our very special PRIDE2020 line up has all the colours of the rainbow with Pere Wihongi who blends old school Māori soul with a New Orleans jazz vibe, Valkyrie’s big power anthems and ‘sounds inspired by the ancients’ and Pōneke singer/songwriter Callan James.
Refreshments will be available

Pere Wihongi (Te Rarawa/Ngā Puhi/Ngāti Kuri/Ngāti Wai) is founding member and co-manager of Māoridom’s current singing sensation ‘Maimoa’.

Valkyrie, New Zealand’s first anthemic theatrical band exploded on to the stage with big power anthems and sounds inspired by the ancients. Described as Pop/Rock or Dark Pop their style is daring, bold and visually pushes boundaries. However they've never been short of capturing the audience’s hearts with their more beautiful slower songs and acoustic performances

Callan James is a singer / songwriter from Porirua whose unique R&B and soul will captivate you.

19 days ago

Taonga and memory: new inscriptions on New Zealand’s Memory of the World Register

The Team from Alexander Turnbull Library

Date: Tuesday, 18 February, 2020
Time: 12:10pm to 1:10pm
Cost: Free
Location: Taiwhanga Kahau — Auditorium (lower ground floor), Corner Molesworth and Aitken Streets, Wellington. Entrance on Aitken Street.

UNESCO Memory of the World New Zealand register
The UNESCO Memory of the World New Zealand… View more
Date: Tuesday, 18 February, 2020
Time: 12:10pm to 1:10pm
Cost: Free
Location: Taiwhanga Kahau — Auditorium (lower ground floor), Corner Molesworth and Aitken Streets, Wellington. Entrance on Aitken Street.

UNESCO Memory of the World New Zealand register
The UNESCO Memory of the World New Zealand register was established in 2010 and currently lists 35 inscriptions of significant documentary heritage. Their custodians include heritage institutions and other organisations in our main cities, small towns and private collections. All greatly contribute to the story of our nation’s history and heritage and are significant to the identity of New Zealanders today.

Hear about the 2019 inscriptions on the New Zealand register
In 2019 five new inscriptions were made to the New Zealand register. Come and hear representatives from Auckland Public Library, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision, Hocken Collections, and the Hocken Collections talk about the items from these collections, why they were selected and why they are important to the history of New Zealand. The five new inscriptions to be discussed are:

• C P Dawes’ early photographs of Hokianga

• meteorological records kept by the Rev Richard Davis from 1839-1851

• WWII NZ Mobile Broadcasting Unit Recordings

•the papers of Dr Muriel Bell, an early medical researcher, and

• the Sir Julius von Haast collection of scientific papers from the late 19th century.

Amongst previous inscriptions are He Whakaputanga, Te Tiriti o Waitangi, the 1893 Women’s Suffrage Petition, the literary papers of Katherine Mansfield, and the Edmund Hillary collection. You can see the full list of the inscriptions on the New Zealand Register

New Zealand Register
UNESCO recognition draws attention to the significance of documentary heritage and the institutions that are its custodians. Inscription on the register raises awareness of the custodian’s institutions and promotes the importance of caring for our documentary heritage.

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24 days ago

Te Hono ki Aotearoa: connecting people and navigating a course for the future — film screening

The Team from Alexander Turnbull Library

This event is part of the Pūkana exhibition — a celebration of moments in Māori performance.
In the National Library Gallery

Date: Tuesday, 11 February, 2020
Time: Doors open 5.30pm for 6.00pm start, ends 8:30pm
Cost: Free
Location: Taiwhanga Kahau — Auditorium (lower ground floor), Corner … View more
This event is part of the Pūkana exhibition — a celebration of moments in Māori performance.
In the National Library Gallery

Date: Tuesday, 11 February, 2020
Time: Doors open 5.30pm for 6.00pm start, ends 8:30pm
Cost: Free
Location: Taiwhanga Kahau — Auditorium (lower ground floor), Corner Molesworth and Aitken Streets, Wellington. Entrance on Aitken Street.

Celebrate an extraordinay intercultural partnership
To celebrate the 10 year anniversary of an extraordinary intercultural partnership which culminated in the creation and exchange of the ceremonial waka taua ‘Te Hono ki Aotearoa’ the Dutch Embassy supported by the National Library will screen the film, followed by kōrero and refreshments.

A living connection between Dutch and Māori cultures
‘Te Hono ki Aotearoa’ follows the journey of a waka taua (ceremonial canoe) hewn from a 600-year-old Kauri. The waka taua was ceremonially gifted, on permanent loan, to the Museum Volkenkunde in Leiden, the Netherlands. It is the first and only case in which another culture is entrusted with the custody of a waka.

New Zealand film maker Jan Bieringa created a film, which traces an extraordinary intercultural partnership from the commission, construction and handover of the waka. The waka taua is appropriately named ‘Te Hono ki Aotearoa’, and can be translated to “The Link New Zealand”.

Netherlands Ambassador Mira Woldberg will give the opening remarks of the 10th anniversary of the waka, a living connection between Dutch and Māori cultures.

Panel discussion
Following the film screening is a panel discussion comprising:

•Steven Engelsman, the former Director of the Volkenkunde Museum

•Alex Miesen, member of the Dutch waka crew who look after the waka

•Jan Bieringa, Director of “Te Hono ki Aotearoa”

•Tamahou Temara, Toi Māori Aotearoa Operations Manager

Image: Te Hono ki Aotearoa on the river Thames for the Queens jubilee. Image used with permission.

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24 days ago

Driving out the devil – A history of mākutu in Aotearoa / New Zealand

The Team from Alexander Turnbull Library

Date: Monday, 10 February, 2020
Time: 5pm to 7pm. Public talk from 5:30pm to 6:30pm. Refreshments from 6:30pm to 7pm
Cost: Free event.
Location: National Library, corner Molesworth and Aitken Streets, Thorndon

Lecture by Judith Binney Fellow, Dr Nepia Mahuika

A free public lecture by 2019 … View more
Date: Monday, 10 February, 2020
Time: 5pm to 7pm. Public talk from 5:30pm to 6:30pm. Refreshments from 6:30pm to 7pm
Cost: Free event.
Location: National Library, corner Molesworth and Aitken Streets, Thorndon

Lecture by Judith Binney Fellow, Dr Nepia Mahuika

A free public lecture by 2019 Judith Binney Fellow, Dr Nepia Mahuika.

A discussion about the Māori practice mākutu
Through a Western lens the Māori practice mākutu has too often been presented as witchcraft, being described by some as the ‘black arts’, ‘black magic, and ‘curses.’
Drawing on work for a forthcoming book on the history of mākutu in Aotearoa New Zealand, Dr Mahuika overturns simplistic perceptions of mākutu as ‘Māori witchcraft’.
Exploring connections that mākutu has to other indigenous peoples in the Pacific and abroad, the lecture challenges all New Zealanders to reimagine the way we see mākutu, bringing a deeper understanding to a topic that has often been misunderstood and sensationalised in novels, films and media reports.

The event will be followed by light refreshments.

About the speaker
Dr Mahuika was the inaugural Judith Binney Fellow in 2019 and is Senior Lecturer in History at the University of Waikato, where he teaches courses in New Zealand History, specialising in Māori and Indigenous History. His Judith Binney Fellowship has supported the completion of a research project on the history of mākutu in Aotearoa / New Zealand.

Dr Mahuika is also president of Te Pouhere Kōrero, a broad collective of Māori colleagues interested in Māori history.

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