17 Alach Street
Gate Pa
Tauranga
  • Curtain Clean
  • NZ's best professional curtain restorers

  • Products and Services
  • Cleaning & Mould Removal

    We are industry specialists in removing mould and mildew from curtains, drapes & blinds.

    Services available

    Repairs, alterations and replacement parts for most window treatments

  • Share
2 days ago

Fabulous fabrics & all the latest trends

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

From global influences to home-made comfort, see the hot trends in home textiles.

Going Global
We may not be able to hop on an airplane any time soon to explore the world but that doesn’t mean we can’t bring home a taste of the exotic – and hang it on the windows or wrap it around our … View more
From global influences to home-made comfort, see the hot trends in home textiles.

Going Global
We may not be able to hop on an airplane any time soon to explore the world but that doesn’t mean we can’t bring home a taste of the exotic – and hang it on the windows or wrap it around our sofas.
Global influences in home textiles are varied with two or three strong looks emerging. One is the traditional block print where basic geometric prints in robust colours are placed onto highly textured base cloth to create an antiqued effect.

There is a tribal nature to these designs echoing patterning from Africa and South America. Turkish influences are also appearing with ottoman-style motifs in faded and antiqued looking colourways.
Says Annie Moir from Mokum: “We see design influences from Asia, the Middle East and Africa working together for cultural fluidity and a celebration of the world’s global heritage. This includes a fresh take on Japan’s rich and sophisticated decorative history.”

Hannah Irvine from Warwick Fabrics says that global influences have always been to the fore, but now more than ever when travel is not possible.

“Our collections in the second half of 2020 draw from traditional Moroccan and Middle Eastern patterns. These textiles are easily layered, encompass rich opulent textures and use warmer tones with solid contrasts. These combinations make for an extremely rich, layered interior.”

Jacqui McKenzie from Harvey Furnishings notes the crossover between the global and handcrafted trends, with handcrafted fabric textures like weaves, embroideries and cut-velvets in colour palettes inspired by traditional Indian dyes and spices: “These bring a global appreciation of traditional craftsmanship, while celebrating diversity.”

Quirky retro
It’s taken over our fashion, and the 1970s retro look continues in our interiors with a resurgence of curvaceous furniture, arches in architecture and bold retro textiles in statement prints.

Alongside this comes a 1950s Hollywood glamour vibe. Says Hannah Irvine of Warwick Fabrics: “We’re calling the trend ‘rewind’. This theme has evolved from last year’s mid-century modern trends. We are seeing lots of 1920s influence in the patterns and palette of yesteryears designs.

“The colours driving rewind include earthy warm browns, tan, ochre and mustard with teal-tinged blues and navy hues to offer a touch of contrast. Materials and texture playing their part in taking us to this theme include leather, suede, velvet, soft-touch chenille, warp knits, corduroy and boucle.”

Says Bolt of Cloth’s Suzannah Tonascia: “Just like fashion, interior trends are cyclic and inspired by other eras – we have been wearing a lot of 70s-inspired clothes and seeing those influences coming into our homes was always likely to follow. People like patterns and fabrics to make them feel good in their homes and the 70s was a really great carefree time – who wouldn’t want a bit of that rubbing off on your life today?”

Suzannah encourages us to have fun with the look: “My favourite use is as a roman blind. You don’t see much of the print when they are open during the day, but drop it down in the evening and it is like a piece of art – amazing.”

Handcrafted & homely
As we seek to return to simpler times, there’s a revival of traditional craft not only in personally making the craft but the influence on home interiors and textile constructions where natural material and traditional techniques are lovingly reinterpreted.

Replications of needlework, cross stitch, crochet and knitting are appearing. Fabrics are also folded and crushed to look handcrafted and irregular. Imperfection is encouraged.

According to Rhea Culliford of James Dunlop Textiles, this trend interconnects with two others, global and textural, with homespun-style fabrics, traditional textile techniques and colour palettes inspired from natural dyes.

Jessica Fitzgibbon of The Textile Company points to the reasoning behind the Invicta collection: “There’s a search for raw expression and valuable heritage. It’s a reflection of art and human science, preserved and enriched by resilient artists, people of other ages and different backgrounds, reuniting the knowledge and crafts of the past with skills of the future.”

Keep reading: www.stuff.co.nz...

5 days ago

How to choose the right Curtain Lining

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

Windows play a major role in controlling the temperature within a home. During winter it is easy to lose heat, and in summer it is easy to overheat a home if windows are not appropriately covered. Professionally fitted, lined drapery can reduce window heat loss by 40-60% when closed*. Working all … View moreWindows play a major role in controlling the temperature within a home. During winter it is easy to lose heat, and in summer it is easy to overheat a home if windows are not appropriately covered. Professionally fitted, lined drapery can reduce window heat loss by 40-60% when closed*. Working all year round, lined drapery is an important tool in creating a thermal insulation barrier.


Today we look at the advantages, types and options of drapery lining.

There are many advantages to drapery lining:
1. Creation of a thermal insulation layer.
2. Protects soft furnishings from sun damage.
3. Resistance to dust and mildew.
4. Creates a dark room environment (dim or black out).
5. Prolongs the appearance and life of your drapes as lining helps protect the fabric from harmful UV rays.
6. Improves drapability.
7. Stronger acoustic properties with more layers.


NOTE: In a hot climate, lining helps to reduce heat transfer into the room.

TYPES OF DRAPERY LINING

There are several different types of lining which can be chosen based on the requirements of each drapery installation.

THERMAL
One layer (1 Pass) of coated acrylic suede compound is known as thermal lining. It offers the advantages of insulation and energy savings, helping to keep rooms’ warm in the winter and cool in the summer. It is important to understand that a certain amount of light will pass into the room with this construction. As with all quality linings, thermal lining not only protects soft furnishings from fading, they are also treated to resist mildew and enables good drapability.
The manufacturing process of a thermal lining involves a thermal coating being applied directly to the reverse side of the fabric to reduce the amount of harmful ultraviolet light passing through the fabric, whilst increasing the insulation.

BLACKOUT
Three layers (3 Pass) of coated acrylic suede compound is known as ‘blackout’ thermal lining. This process offers the same benefits of thermal lining but also totally eliminates light penetration. Blackout lining naturally minimizes the risk of natural flaws in the fabric from showing through. It also adds body to the fabric and provides a good stable base for roman blinds.
TIP: when drawing your curtains during the day, a blackout lining will ensure the colour of your main drape isn’t saturated/washed out by sunlight.

DIMOUT / TRIPLE WEAVE
Unlike coated linings, a dimout lining is a woven construction which allows a small amount of light to pass through – hence the name ‘dimout’ as opposed to ‘blackout’. It is a popular lining in both commercial and residential applications due to its affordability, washability and noise reduction properties. It has a soft, thick handle which adds fullness to a light weight fabric such as silk and taffeta.
TIP: Darker dimouts achieve a higher degree of light reduction than lighter colours.

INTERLINING
Interlining adds body and fullness to lightweight fabrics such as silk and taffeta. Its composition is typically either a blend of polyester/viscose/cotton or 100% napped cotton. Interlining also improves insulation and acoustic properties of a room through noise reduction and provides extra protection from harmful UV rays. It works as additional padding for headboards and pelmets when used between the face fabric and lining.

SILICONE
Advancements in technology have led to coated lining layers being made of a silicone compound, which creates a soft agile handle and has the added benefit of not eliciting or holding any loose dust as experienced with acrylic suede lining. Silicone backed lining is a coated lining product with three layers of silicone on one side, providing protection from elements such as sun and moisture. This product is also washable, making it easier to maintain, however it cannot be dry-cleaned.

NOTE FOR COATED LININGS:
For both thermal coated and blackout coated linings, the coated side of the fabric must face the glass to maximize UV and mildew resistant properties.
Thermal lining and blackout lining is NOT machine washable, it may be gently hand washed if necessary, drip dried with coated surfaces facing out. Professional cleaning by a specialist is the recommended option.

ATTRIBUTES

FIRE RETARDANT

Linings with fire retardant attributes have either had a treatment applied to the yarn/fabric retrospectively or the fibre/yarns used to produce the fabric have been engineered to possess inherent FR characteristics. FR linings meet all government requirements/standards and are suitable for residential and commercial use.

OEKO-TEX
ENVIRONMENTALLY BETTER - Oeko-Tex Standard 100 is an independent international certification. Linings that carry this certification mean that the fabric is free from harmful substances and safe for people and the environment. For more information visit oeko-tex.com/standard100.

Interested in adding a lining to your existing curtains? We can help with that! Call us on 0800 579 0501 to book in.

9 days ago

How Curtain Linings Work

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

Windows play a major role in controlling the temperature within a home. During winter it is easy to lose heat, and in summer it is easy to overheat a home if windows are not appropriately covered. Lining is a cost-effective addition to help protect your curtain fabric, while providing some added … View moreWindows play a major role in controlling the temperature within a home. During winter it is easy to lose heat, and in summer it is easy to overheat a home if windows are not appropriately covered. Lining is a cost-effective addition to help protect your curtain fabric, while providing some added insulation for the home, reducing window heat loss by 40-60% when closed. Working all year round, lined drapery is an important tool in creating a thermal insulation barrier. Lined curtains have an added lining layer on the back of the curtain which can be attached to the curtain or can be hung on a separate track behind the curtain.


Linings help your window furnishings last longer: With a good quality lining, your chosen curtain fabric is shielded from the harsh UV rays of the sun, preventing your fabric from fading.


Linings provide added privacy: A lot of fabrics are only somewhat private, especially at night. Adding a lining to your window furnishings will increase the opacity of the treatment, ensuring complete privacy.


Linings provide increased insulation: Insulated linings trap air in and between the layers of fabric, preventing the heat in your homes escaping out the windows, and offering significant savings on your energy bill.


Linings can provide light control: Ideal for bedrooms and media rooms, block-out linings allows you to block light coming through a window and keep your rooms dark in the middle of the day.

Linings improve the appearance of window furnishings: The colours of your chosen fabric can appear richer when a lining is placed behind them. Without a lining, sunlight coming through a fabric can make the colours appear washed out during the day.



Call us or your local Curtain makers to discuss adding a lining to your current curtains.

15 days ago

DIY Double Glazing with Insulation Film

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

Window insulation film works on the same principle as standard double glazing by creating a layer of still air in front of the glass that acts as insulation. DIY window insulation kits consist of clear plastic film for attaching to wooden window sashes or frames using double-sided adhesive tape. … View moreWindow insulation film works on the same principle as standard double glazing by creating a layer of still air in front of the glass that acts as insulation. DIY window insulation kits consist of clear plastic film for attaching to wooden window sashes or frames using double-sided adhesive tape. They cost a fraction of the price of double glazing yet offer good performance in reducing heat loss and condensation in your home, as well as preventing your sills and window dressings from going mouldy. You can pick up a kit from your local Mitre 10 or Bunnings.

Window insulation film is only designed to last one season, but it may remain intact for several years if your windows are in good condition and the film is undisturbed. Just be aware that adhesive tape used on the film may leave a stain if you leave it on for longer than one season.

Tips for installing
Installing DIY window insulation film is relatively easy - you only need a pair of scissors and a hair dryer.
• Make sure your window frames are dry and the paint is in good condition to avoid condensation forming inside the air gap.
• For wooden windows, applying a bead of sealant like silicone along the glass edge will further reduce the risk of moisture creeping into the air gap.
• Make sure your window pane is clean and streak free before putting the insulation up.

Step 1: Clean the Window
Clean the window thoroughly with an ammonia-based window cleaner and wipe it dry using a squeegee. Make sure that all of the window cleaner is wiped off, as it will dissolve the adhesive on the window film.

Step 2: Wet the glass with a light spray of water and baby shampoo
Fill a spray bottle with water and add a couple of drops of baby shampoo. Spray the mixture onto the window. This mixture helps the film stick to the window but still lets you slide the film around so you can fit it properly into the corners before the mixture dries.

Step 3: Measure and trim the film to size
Measure the window to see how large an area you need to cover, allowing at least two centimetres overlap for all four sides. Roll the window film out onto a flat horizontal surface and trim to size. Before you put the film on the window, start peeling the backing off the sticky side of the film. Use masking tape on both sides of one corner to get the peeling started.

Step 4: Put the window film onto the window
Once you’ve peeled off the top five to ten centimetres of backing, move the film up to the surface of the window. Start by putting the top two corners in place. Once the film is sitting in a good position you can slowly start to take the rest of the backing off.

Step 5: Remove the backing from window film as you go
Slowly peel the backing off in stages. Use a squeegee to flatten the film out onto the window as you go. Start the squeegee in the centre of the window and push out to the edges. As you work down the window, use the spray bottle to keep the surface as moist as possible. It will give you a much smoother finish.

Step 6: Remove the air bubbles from the window film
Once the squeegee has got the larger bubbles out, use the small plastic scraper to remove any smaller bubbles. You can work out any small pockets of water at the same time. Whatever small amounts of moisture are left will work with the adhesive on the film to create a bond to the window.

Step 7: Give the window film a final trim

When all the bubbles are out, take a sharp blade and give the film a final trim at the edges of the window. Once you’ve trimmed the edges, give the film one final scrape with the small plastic scraper. Tuck the corners in as hard as you can, squeegeeing towards the outside, working out the last remnants of water.



Remember Curtain Clean can help with those mouldy curtains, give us a call on 0800 579 0501 to find your local shop.

We would love to see or hear about your finished projects if you give them a try, please get in touch and let us know!

Image
35 days ago

TIPS FOR MAINTAINING YOUR CLEAN CURTAINS

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

Before re-hanging your clean curtains, we recommend you thoroughly wash the inside of your windows and frames with warm soapy water with a small amount of bleach in to get rid of any mould spores that are present, taking care not to splash on your carpet or other soft furnishings.


Mould grows … View more
Before re-hanging your clean curtains, we recommend you thoroughly wash the inside of your windows and frames with warm soapy water with a small amount of bleach in to get rid of any mould spores that are present, taking care not to splash on your carpet or other soft furnishings.


Mould grows as a result of sun, moisture and dust or dirt so any attempts to minimize these environmental conditions will help.


- Removing the moisture from your windows each morning.
- Curtains can be vacuumed using the round brush attachment to remove dust
- Ensuites can be a major source of moisture in a bedroom, ensure these are well ventilated
- Avoid drying washing inside
- Opening windows for a small amount of time each day to let the moisture out of your home
- Curtains can be spot cleaned using a solution of washing powder and warm water – this will often leave a watermark so spots should be patted dry with a towel, then dried with a hair dryer.

- Please note: “Exit-Mould” & citrus cleaners will most often strip the colour out of your curtain and leave chemicals in the fabric that will cause it to rot

Call us today on 0800 579 0501 to book in for a clean!

27 days ago

Consumer's curtain investigation; how to keep warm this winter

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

Keeping your home this winter doesn't have to put you in debt, but you will have to be creative.
Consumer have revealed the best curtains to invest in as temperatures begin to cool down to help stop nearly two-thirds of a home's heat from going out its windows.

Honeycomb blinds - … View more
Keeping your home this winter doesn't have to put you in debt, but you will have to be creative.
Consumer have revealed the best curtains to invest in as temperatures begin to cool down to help stop nearly two-thirds of a home's heat from going out its windows.

Honeycomb blinds - which have hexagonal shaped cells in its structure - were the standout performer of the five different blinds tested. Others involved were roman, roller and aluminium and wooden venetians. Both thermal and heavy-lined curtains were also tested.

Consumer head of testing Dr Paul Smith said the heat loss test was measured through an aluminium-framed single-glazed window with each curtain hung for at least three hours. He was pleased to find the honeycomb blinds topped the test having put them in his own home about nine years ago.
He said the hexagonal cells in the curtain, which when extended trap the air in the cells, "acting like a down jacket; trapping still air".

"It was good for me seeing this because anecdotally I thought 'oh these are doing a great job' because when you open the curtains in the morning you can see all the cold air fall out from behind the window."

In the test, the honeycomb blinds retained more than 60 per cent of the heat lost through a bare window.

Roman blinds were the second best performing blind, followed by roller blinds. As for wooden or aluminium venetians, wooden were proven the better insulator, he said. If curtains were preferred, people were urged to go "heavy" and long.

Heavy-lined curtains were ones which had two layers which again acted as an air trap. To get the best result, they needed to go down to the ground, no matter the size of the window, to keep the cold air out.

It was best to keep the gap between the curtain or blind and the frame of the window as small as possible.

Thermal curtains - a curtain which has a thermal layer stitched to the back - did not perform as well as the heavy-lined curtains, he said. However, Dr Smith had come up with a few cheap hacks for people not bothered about what there lounge or particular room looks like for a few cold nights over winter. One was hanging a blanket over the top of your curtains.

"It is less convenient because you've got to hang a blanket and take it down each time.

"We pinned it up where the railing was, so we just pinned it up above the window and just let it hang down and cover the whole window."

The other option was to roll up towels and sit them above your window railing which again prevented cold air circulating around the room.

"It stops the air being sucked in to the top. So when the hot air rises up to the ceiling. If the curtains aren't well-fitted, that warm air falls behind the window.

"They call it the reverse chimney so it's like the air coming down past the window and all the heat being lost, so if you put something across the top it stops that from happening."

TOP TIPS FOR HEAT RETENTION
• Mount curtains as close as possible to the window frame,
• Position nets as close to the window as possible,
• Use floor length curtains and ensure they touch the floor,
• Make curtains a generous width so they overlap the window frames at the sides,
• Using net curtains help with heat retention, especially on wooden frame windows,

• Using a fan "significantly" reduces heat loss.

www.nzherald.co.nz...



ENSURE YOUR CURTAINS ARE CLEAN THIS WINTER

Your health is ALWAYS important, but now more than ever we need to stay on top of it, especially in our environment. Check your curtains regularly for live mould and visible dirt. Curtain Clean can take care of any contamination and ensure your curtains return to you clean and sanitised!


www.curtainclean.co.nz...

Image
36 days ago

Increasing the lifespan of your textiles

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

- AN EDUCATIONAL YARN -


As well as focusing on the aesthetic and functional needs of interiors, it is important to understand that all fabrics have different qualities and constructions which can be affected by the environments they are installed in. In our next topic for our blog series – … View more
- AN EDUCATIONAL YARN -


As well as focusing on the aesthetic and functional needs of interiors, it is important to understand that all fabrics have different qualities and constructions which can be affected by the environments they are installed in. In our next topic for our blog series – An Educational Yarn - we look at these common issues and how we can increase the lifespan of textiles in our interior applications.

- STABILITY & MOVEMENT -
Best choice: Polyester, acrylic, cotton and blends
Caution: Silk, linen, viscose in lightweight constructions.

Fabric stability is particularly critical for curtains and blinds and while a degree of tolerance is essential because all fibres expand and contract as a result of atmospheric changes, some fibres are more affected than others.

Generally fabrics alter in length when they absorb or release moisture. Fibres that release a lot of moisture will obviously ‘move’ more. Most natural fibres absorb moisture readily, which is why they are used for towels etc. Synthetic or man-made fibres have very poor absorption which can make them uncomfortable to wear, but in furnishings they ‘move’ less. However, other factors must also be taken into account such as location, for example the proximity to the sea.


As sea air is heavy with salt, being anhydrous (it absorbs water), when this adheres and settles amongst the fibres, this will naturally attract moisture and this will cause additional weight.


- DURABILITY / PILLING -


Though this applies mainly to upholstery fabrics, pilling and abrasion damage can also occur in drapery if there is constant rubbing against walls and frames. Different weaves greatly affect a fabric’s performance, such as the density of weave and the number of floating fibres, but if woven for a situation where strength and abrasion resistance are the prime consideration, then cotton, linen, polyester, nylon, acrylic and wool can make strong and durable upholstery fabrics. Nylon particularly, when even 10% is blended with cotton or linen, produces a far more abrasion resistant fabric.
While the above are guidelines, understanding the properties of fibres will help in discerning their suitability in certain situations.

Many fabrics contain combinations of yarns in order to achieve the best performance and effect.

Abrasion ratings are part of assessing upholstery fabrics, but understanding ratings of tensile seam slippage and pilling is also critical. Quality suppliers with reputable brands and standards will supply only ‘fit for purpose’ products.

- HUMIDITY -

Best choice: Polyester, acrylic
Caution: Cotton, wool, silk, viscose, linen
In humid conditions, bacteria, fungi (mildew) and sometimes moth larvae can create unsightly problems and in some cases totally destroy the fibres. Generally mildew thrives on natural and cellulose fibres e.g. cotton, silk, wool, linen and viscose.

While good air circulation in a room coupled with hanging curtains at least 10 cm from the glass helps, selecting fibres such as polyester and acrylic, which are mildew resistant, is a better option. However, even this may not completely eliminate the problem.

While mildew will not grow on these fibres, it will grow on dust or dirt which may become trapped between the fibres. Regular vacuuming and washing or dry cleaning will help prevent this but in extreme conditions, this is no guarantee. High levels of humidity are the largest contributor to drapery movement.

TIPS: In curtaining, unless the fabric is a sun filter or sheer, it should always be lined. An allowance must be given for a certain amount of movement as a result of atmospheric conditions.

Considering all the different fibre characteristics, the blending of different fibres into yarns and the combining of different yarns into fabrics can overcome many of the disadvantages of specific fibres.

- SUNLIGHT & UV DEGRADATION -

Best choice: Acrylic and polyesters blends
Caution: Silks, wools

While Southern Hemisphere conditions can be so severe that virtually no fabric producer worldwide will guarantee their products at the window, with modern technology, beautiful fabrics are being created which will perform well with long-term satisfaction, even in harsh conditions. Sunlight degradation is one of the prime considerations of curtaining and man-made fibres perform well in resisting damaging rays. The fibre most resilient to sunlight damage is acrylic, followed very closely by polyester. If fabrics made from these fibres do experience colour change, the problem will probably be with the dye or cleaning process, not the fibre.

Of the natural fibres, cotton and linen have quite good sun resistance and again, any colour change here is usually the result of dye or cleaning. However, it is recommended that for Australasian conditions, these fabrics should be protected with a quality lining.

Silk is admired for its beauty and luxury, however it is sensitive to UV damage and affected by even reflected light. The addition of coated linings coupled with bumf will help protect the fabric, although the exposed ‘leading edge’ of curtains will likely still deteriorate. Where possible, it will increase the life of silk curtains if they can be stacked beyond the window.

TIPS: If your client insists on using delicate fabrics make them fully aware of the ramifications of their choice by recording any ‘industry performance’ notations in your quotes. This can save a lot of issues later on.

Leading edges of curtains (those facing the windows) are particularly vulnerable to sunlight degradation. To help minimise this effect, it is recommended that curtains be rotated periodically where possible, i.e. the left-hand curtain swapped into the right-hand position, annually. A quality sun filter is also important where sunlight is directly reflecting on the fabric behind the glass.

Rotate furniture cushions frequently to ensure sun degradation occurs evenly.

Using a synthetic ‘band’ of a contrast fabric down the leading edge will help to protect the curtains and can also be a dramatic design feature.

It is important to have a realistic understanding that all fabrics, regardless of dyestuffs used, will eventually fade/deteriorate under direct sunlight over time. James Dunlop Textiles utilise the best standard dyestuffs, and whilst no warranty can be made as to colour fastness because of our extreme UV conditions, they should perform sufficiently under normal conditions provided proper care is taken.


- GENERAL TIPS -



Fabrics manufactured from natural fibres that are not dyed may suffer from after bleaching, causing lightening or a deepening in colour when exposed to natural light. As this is a natural phenomenon, allowance must be made for this unpreventable colour change reaction. Some yarns, such as silk, are even susceptible to indirect UV rays and every precaution should be taken to protect the fabric by the use of a bumf or interlining as well as conventional lining. Even then, colour degradation may still occur over time.
A superior quality lining is always recommended for drapery applications. Depending on the situation, there are many different linings available e.g. coated linings for added insulation and protection, and three pass blackout linings where light control is a priority such as in children’s bedrooms.

Curtains should be hung at least 10 cm from the glass to enable air to circulate. This helps prevent mildew and reduces heat build-up that will also adversely affect fabrics. Regular cleaning of windows is also very beneficial as this removes mildew spores, which can accumulate and transfer onto curtains.

Depending on fibre content, there will always be some movement in curtain length (the longer the curtain, the greater the variation) due to temperature change and the absorption and release of atmospheric moisture from the yarn of the fabric. This is normal for heavy yarns such as cotton.


To maintain and preserve the lifespan of your furnishings, regular cleaning and maintenance should be carried out. Call Curtain Clean for all your needs on 0800 579 0501.

48 days ago

Roller blind won’t go up and down straight? Here's how to fix it yourself.

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

t's about time we shared one of our best kept not-so-secrets....

A common problem with roller screens or roller blinds is that they start tracking to one side and eventually will wear away the side of the blind curtain with the threads causing a problem in the mechanism.

The reason can … View more
t's about time we shared one of our best kept not-so-secrets....

A common problem with roller screens or roller blinds is that they start tracking to one side and eventually will wear away the side of the blind curtain with the threads causing a problem in the mechanism.

The reason can be that the material has stretched or has moved on the blind shaft. Things like insects or stray bits of stuff can be wrapped up in the roll as the blind is rolled up.

The first thing to do is to make sure there is no foreign objects or insects rolled into the roll and make sure the blind is attached to the roller properly. Do this by rolling the blind down to its full extent and checking.

If the sides are damaged you should make sure any loose threads etc are cleared and you can trim the damaged side with a sharp pair of scissors. To do this remove the blind from the brackets.

Many of the blinds have a spring loaded pin at the end opposite the chain. This spring is retracted by turning the knurled wheel either up or down till the spring is retracted. The blind can then be removed by lowering it and sliding it off the other bracket. The more level the blind the easier to remove from the other bracket. Sometimes it will come down leaving the drive still there. If so, all you need to do is remove the drive and replace in the shaft.
Some blinds have lift up out of bracket ends or plastic roller pins that need a small screw driver to remove.

Some blinds are a spring loaded one end and have a lift up attachment on the other end.
(If you are not sure how, Google, “taking down roller blind shades” and you will find a video for the type you have.)

Hint here, ensure the blind is rolled up before removing. Lay the blind on a table or floor and trim.

Roll the blind up again.
Reinstall the blind.

When doing that make sure that when you fit the drive end back onto the bracket, that the cover over the chain wheel is at the top so the chain can run properly (It should be in the 11 – 1 position.), and that the chain is free. The spring pin should just push up into its bracket. If it is a bit tight you can use the wheel to wind the spring in and then you can let the pin out once in position.

Roll the blind up and down several times.
If the blind is rolling to one side then you can adjust this.

Let the blind right down till you can see the where the fabric is fastened to the roll shaft.
What you need to do is to put a strip of masking tape on the roller shaft, where the material is attached, at the end that you want the blind to roll back too. i.e. the opposite end to the way it rolls across to now.

Depending on the width of the blind a strip 100-150 mm will be long enough for a blind up to a meter wide but for a wider blind you can put a strip 250-300mm long.

Try rolling up the blind and if it is still rolling to the side then you can add another strip the same size on top of the first one. Add more strips as necessary. Simple stuff to do.


Article with Pictures: curtaincleaners.co.nz...

Image
51 days ago

Does the water on the windows cause mouldy Curtains?

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

The answer: Not Directly.

Only if the curtains are actually touching or touch the window, which most don’t. It derives from and does contribute to the general humidity in the surrounds around the curtain which again contributes to the development of mould. Water on windows is mostly somewhere … View more
The answer: Not Directly.

Only if the curtains are actually touching or touch the window, which most don’t. It derives from and does contribute to the general humidity in the surrounds around the curtain which again contributes to the development of mould. Water on windows is mostly somewhere between 75 and 100 mm from a curtain so how it hops the space to create mould is an interesting question.

I have seen curtains more than a meter from the windows and still moldy and curtains 20 years old with no mould. Not in the sun.

Moisture on windows is caused by the lower dew point of the glass. The warmer the air in a room/house the more moisture it will hold. It is a natural reaction for the moisture in the air to collect on the cool glass as the warm moist air attempts to equalize the air temperature and the glass temperature. The cooler glass sucks the heat out of the air.

Heat always travels from hot towards cold, leaving the moisture on the window and the warmth heating the glass until the outside temperature is the same as the inside temperature.

The closer together the temperature of the air and the glass the less it will happen. Indeed in the summer it works in the opposite where the higher temp of the glass heats the air in the room. This would also occur on days in the winter when the air in the house is cooler than the glass that’s heated by the sun. As soon as the temperature reverses the dew point on the glass lowers and then we have moisture on the windows. Same happens in your car.

Now without the sun or heating of some kind warming the curtains and the room, the curtains would remain at the ambient room air temperature but that’s not what happens. Heating or the sun will warm the curtains which like the air absorb the moisture from the air around them. This is also influenced by the humidity in the air at the time. If the curtains are cooler than the air in the room then any humidity will be absorbed by the curtains.

In doing so they also absorb the bacteria that is entrapped in that moisture. It important to note that that moisture can be from any source both inside and outside of the immediate vicinity of the curtains, for moisture in the air is carried by air currents that swirl around constantly, due to breeze, air temperature, movement by people and so on.

The curtains will adjust their own temperature and level of water absorbed up and down depending on the same factors, i.e. air temp, amount of heat applied to them by the sun and the amount of heat the material is able to absorb and retain and the all this is complicated by the time which curtains retain that heat and for how long.

So we have material curtains that absorb and release both heat and moisture all the time depending on the room conditions.


Thus we have curtains that essentially become mini glass houses or incubators, especially in the folds or where the sun has a high heat impact upon the material. A further compounding factor is the closeness of the material bulk to the wall. If as is mostly the case curtains are bunched against the wall, especially after being heated by the sun in the mornings, then the incubator effect is heightened. The same applies to late afternoon except that at that time the sun is intense and hotter than morning so the curtains retain more heat for longer. Midday sun is at a higher angle and so doesn’t affect the curtains so much.


The type of material also has an effect. Many older materials were natural and tended to allow more passage of air. Many of the modern materials are almost impervious to air and in the case of say taffeta’s and blackout material there is no “breathing” at all.

The use of Blackout material on many curtains has both the effect of no “breathing and it also retains an enormous amount of heat where the sun shines upon it. Put taffeta and blackout together and it’s a given that curtains and or more likely the linings will go moldy, even in rooms where there is standard ventilation.

How does the warmth affect the curtains?


As with all incubators and glass houses the warmth creates an ideal condition for bacteria to grow. Longer periods of warmth, especially where the humidity is high, such as in curtain folds, and even in the material fibres themselves encourage the growth of bacteria. Bacteria thrive in colonies and have an enormous rate of duplication, and will grow colonies that live and hibernate and create their spores that continue to reinfect and grow the new colonies.


This growth happens in the warm, mostly summer and on curtains is mostly seen as an orange-y or reddish spots. These colonies flourish and die and then regrow from the spores left in the curtains. This may happen for several years before they become easily seen.


By the time most people notice the mildew the bacteria have died, due to the cooler winter temperature and left their spores which have turned black. That’s what we see. They are hibernating mould bacteria which are responsible for the black stain seen on curtains and linings.


It would be rare for this to contaminate the curtains in a short period of time to a degree where it is very visible and usually we could expect two to three years for this to be readily visible and often longer. The black often becomes visible after winter when the cold has had its effect on the bacteria.

Where does all this moisture come from?
The air always contains moisture to a greater or lesser extent. In New Zealand, area’s such as Auckland, Bay of Plenty, Waikato and others have high levels of humidity on any given day because we are close to the sea.
Inside of a house as well as the air humidity level there are other sources of humidity.

People. People exhale moisture when breathing. Closing bedroom doors at night means that that moisture remains inside the bedroom unless there is ventilation to change the air.

En-suites which are now very popular contribute to the moisture in a house, are as do showers and cooking, especially boiling pots of water.
Un-flued Gas Heaters run on LPG are big contributors to the humidity in the room because the gas burns to produce CO2 and water aka Moisture.
Now we want to have these facilities as well as warm houses so we have created an ideal world for bacteria.

Some of the issues can be easily mitigated.


Heat pumps do not remove moisture from a house except at low temperatures whereas dehumidifiers remove the moisture from the air in the house and produce warmth in the process. Tiny ones are not much good but there are a number of larger models.(Remember your science and you will recall that the warmer the air the more moisture it holds, so warming it with a heat pump allows the air to hold more moisture from your cooking, showers etc. Dehumidifiers work by extracting that water, something the heat pump can’t/won’t do.). Using a dehumidifier means not having to install a ventilation system at more cost. Allowing for better room ventilation with cool air. Especially of the windows can be left just open to facilitate cool air inflow.

By changing the curtain rail brackets from the standard 65mm to 80 or 100mm so that the curtains are further from the walls and the windows. This allows for more air circulation around the curtains and thus less higher temperatures. Having separate blackout curtains on a different rail to the other curtains. Install a ShowerDome. In our experience roof ventilation systems and double glazing do not prevent this mildew problem but may delay its onset.


Too late? We can clean your mouldy curtains - visit curtainclean.co.nz or call us on 07-579 0501 to book in today.

64 days ago

When should You Clean Your Curtains?

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

Question; “when should I clean my curtains?”

If your curtains have gotten grubby with handling or your cat or dog has messed them up, something has caused them to be wet or they are getting mouldy, then time to have them cleaned.
Once the black mould is showing then that is a good time.
View more
Question; “when should I clean my curtains?”

If your curtains have gotten grubby with handling or your cat or dog has messed them up, something has caused them to be wet or they are getting mouldy, then time to have them cleaned.
Once the black mould is showing then that is a good time.
The more mould the more risk that it will be on the curtain fabric and the stain may not be removed.
The more mould the greater the health risk from mould spores being breathed in.

Should I leave them until after the winter?”

There is no need to leave them and cleaning them in the winter is actually more sensible.
Mould doesn’t normally grow in the cold.
Mould grows in warm, humid conditions so mould grows on your curtains during the warm summer.

It may not be visible to you as it is usually a yellow/ orange colour when alive.
When it gets cold ( as in the winter), it then goes into the spore form and that’s when you see it as a black, smelly mess on the curtains. Once it turns black it then releases more spores that will come alive and grow into more mould colonies once the curtains get warm again. Ideally, its best to remove these mould spores from your rooms before they spread. The spores may attach to other furnishings and the walls and of course float around in the air. Not healthy at all.
Cleaning the curtains in the winter and removing the mould actually helps stop the spores from spreading.
All curtains are sanitized to remove bacteria and viruses.

Curtain Clean are specialists in removing the mould from your curtains.
We are open again for curtain cleaning. See us at 17 Alach St. in Greerton or give us a call. We can take down,and rehang your curtains after cleaning.

Image
74 days ago

Return to Work.

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

Covid - 19 Update.
Curtain Clean will be reopening for Curtain Cleaning on
Wednesday the 29th of April.
Parcels can be couriered to us from Tuesday the 28th of April.

Curtains can be brought in but there will be a requirement to keep personal distance etc. in line with the various … View more
Covid - 19 Update.
Curtain Clean will be reopening for Curtain Cleaning on
Wednesday the 29th of April.
Parcels can be couriered to us from Tuesday the 28th of April.

Curtains can be brought in but there will be a requirement to keep personal distance etc. in line with the various recommendations.

We all look forward to making your place cleaner and safer.
Remember all curtains are sanitized for your well being.

Curtains and Drapes covered in mould, mildew, dirt and grime?
Give your curtains a new life, gain healthier living with Curtain Clean

113 days ago

Happy St Patricks Day!

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

Here are 10 interesting facts about St Pattys Day to celebrate the holiday.
1. St. Patrick was not Irish - Ireland's patron saint was, in fact, from Wales!
2. The first St. Patrick's Day parade took place in New York in the 1760s.
3. Though we've come to associate kelly green with… View more
Here are 10 interesting facts about St Pattys Day to celebrate the holiday.
1. St. Patrick was not Irish - Ireland's patron saint was, in fact, from Wales!
2. The first St. Patrick's Day parade took place in New York in the 1760s.
3. Though we've come to associate kelly green with the Irish and the holiday, the 5th-century saint's official colour was "Saint Patrick's blue," a light shade of sky blue. The colour green only became associated with the big day after it was linked to the Irish independence movement in the late 18th century.
4. Don’t be fooled by any holiday decorations showing lady leprechauns. In traditional Irish folk tales, there are no female leprechauns, only nattily attired little guys who spend their days making and mending shoes (meaning they earned that gold they're always guarding).
5. St. Patrick never got canonized by a pope, making his saintly status somewhat questionable.
6. Guinness sales soar on St. Patrick's Day. Recent figures show that 5.5 million pints of the black stuff are downed around the world every day. On St. Patrick's Day that figure is doubled.
7. Your odds of finding a four-leaf clover are about 1 in 10,000.
8. How did the shamrock become associated with St. Patrick? According to Irish legend, the saint used the three-leafed plant (which is not to be confused with the four-leaf clover) as a metaphor for the Holy Trinity when he was first introducing Christianity to Ireland.
9. According to Irish legend, St. Patrick wasn't originally called Patrick. His birth name was Maewyn Succat, but he changed it to Patricius after becoming a priest.
10. In Chicago every year, the Plumbers Local 110 union dyes the river "Kelly" green. The dye lasts for about five hours.

126 days ago

Fabric trends for 2020!

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

FABRIC TRENDS TO LOOK OUT FOR IN 2020:


MAXIMALISM - Prints and patterns become more daring, referencing a maximalist aesthetic with a ‘more is more’ approach.
FLORA AND FAUNA - Ever present; dense, lush tropical designs continue to flourish, wild blooms are a key floral story and monkey … View more
FABRIC TRENDS TO LOOK OUT FOR IN 2020:


MAXIMALISM - Prints and patterns become more daring, referencing a maximalist aesthetic with a ‘more is more’ approach.
FLORA AND FAUNA - Ever present; dense, lush tropical designs continue to flourish, wild blooms are a key floral story and monkey motifs remain prevalent, depicted in jungle landscapes whether on bold contrasting backgrounds or camouflaged within simple illustrative repeats.

JAPANESE - A new wave of Asian influence will come in anticipation for the up and coming Tokyo Olympics. Prepare for a fresh take on Japan’s rich and sophisticated decorative history. Prints will replicate traditional screen printing, hand painted motifs and dying techniques, bringing ancient Asian craft into the modern day.
GRAPHIC - Surface patterns will be represented through mid-century and Art Deco geometrics.
SUBTLETY - Subtle patterns are created via matte finishes, quilting and embossing, providing texture and tactility, particularly suiting “of the moment” curvaceous furniture frames. Printing techniques are used to create “barely there” pattern, like water ripples and reflection inspired by natural landscapes creating a serene minimalist aesthetic Adding to this concept is the use of embroidery and metallic yarn embellishments to add subtle texture and glamour.
PAST TENSE - Patterns from archival collections with rich heritage will been reworked in a modern way. Using bold contemporary scale and the latest weaving techniques, traditional pattern will be given a modern twist.
Keep reading: jamesdunloptextiles.com...

134 days ago

How to Make a No-Sew T-Shirt Bag

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

Here at Curtain Clean we are big advocates of sustainability. Clean, re-use, recycle!

Help us reduce waste and have fun doing it with our little tutorial on how to turn a T-shirt into a re-usable bag.



You’ll need:• Old t-shirt – The thicker the fabric, the sturdier the bag
• … View more
Here at Curtain Clean we are big advocates of sustainability. Clean, re-use, recycle!

Help us reduce waste and have fun doing it with our little tutorial on how to turn a T-shirt into a re-usable bag.



You’ll need:• Old t-shirt – The thicker the fabric, the sturdier the bag
• Sharp scissors, preferably fabric scissors

• Washable marker (optional)


Step 1: Cut the sleeves off so it resembles a singlet.



Step 2: Cut the neckline area into a circle or oval – these will become our handles. Trace a bowl to get a perfectly round circle.


Step 3: Turn the t-shirt inside out. Determine where you want the bottom of the bag to be and trace a line across. Keep in mind that depending on the fabric used, your tote is likely stretch and become longer when it’s filled with stuff.


Step 4: Cut slits from the bottom of the shirt up to the line marking the bottom of your bag. Keep the slits small to prevent large gaps in the bottom of the bag. You’ll want to cut both the front and back layers together because they need to match up for the next step.


Step 5: Tie the front and back fringe together in knots and turn the shirt right side out. For extra embellishments, tie the straps (handles) in knots, or tie bits of t-shirt scrap to the top.


P.S. We'd love to see your creations!!

149 days ago

Spare Parts for Blinds

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

Are your vertical blinds looking a little worse for wear?

We stock replacement parts for all brands and sizes - hangers, weights, chains and more.

Weights: $1.00 each
Chain: $1.50 per metre
Hangers: .75c each

Come see us at 17 Alach Street, Greerton

Top